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Wątek: NATURALNE sposoby optymalizacji CIAŁA i DUSZY.

  1. #586
    Sztywny Pal Azji
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    January 9, 2019
    Excessive body fat around the middle linked to smaller brain size, study finds

    Carrying extra body fat, especially around the middle, may be linked to brain shrinkage, according to new research. For the study, researchers determined obesity by measuring body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio in study participants and found those with higher ratios of both measures had the lowest brain volume.
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0109164233.htm



    "Brain over Body" Michigan Study

    correlation doesn't imply causation

  2. #587
    htw jaka temperatura do spania najlepsza?
    Słyszałeś o "ciężkich" kołdrach? Czytałem gdzieś, jakaś firma produkuje specjalne kołdry, które wywierają nacisk na ciało. Podobno zbawiennie to działa na sen. Słyszałeś coś o tym? Zwykły marketing czy to prawda?

  3. #588
    Sztywny Pal Azji
    Dołączył
    May 2014
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    1 398
    Słyszałeś o "ciężkich" kołdrach? Czytałem gdzieś, jakaś firma produkuje specjalne kołdry, które wywierają nacisk na ciało. Podobno zbawiennie to działa na sen. Słyszałeś coś o tym? Zwykły marketing czy to prawda?
    nic mi o tym nie wiadomo, przetestuj i powiedz

    jaka temperatura do spania najlepsza?
    powinno być zdecydowanie chłodniej niż normalnie (w ciągu dnia), ale nie zimno.
    Spadek temperatury jest informacją, że nadchodzi noc.
    Próbowałem spać w zimnych warunkach - nie polecam. Delikatny chłodek jest imho optymalny.

    Sex differences in 'body clock' may benefit women's heart health

    The body's circadian clock -- the biological clock that organizes bodily activities over a 24-hour period -- contributes to normal variations in blood pressure and heart function over the course of the day. In most healthy humans, blood pressure dips at night. People who do not experience this temporary drop, called "non-dippers," are more likely to develop heart disease. The circadian clock is made up of four main proteins (encoded by "clock genes") that regulate close to half of all genes in the body, including those important for blood pressure regulation.

    Previous research has shown that male mice that are missing one of the four clock genes (PER1) become non-dippers and have a higher risk for heart and kidney disease. A research team studied the circadian response and blood pressure of female mice that lack PER1 and compared them with a healthy female control group. On both low- and high-salt diets, both groups "retained an apparent circadian rhythm" of blood pressure, the researchers explained. Unlike the male mice in previous research, the females without PER1 showed normal dips in blood pressure overnight.

    These results suggest that the lack of PER1 acts differently in males and females. The findings are consistent with research showing that premenopausal women are less likely to be non-dippers than men of the same age. "This study represents an important step in understanding sex differences in the regulation of cardiovascular function by the circadian clock," the researchers wrote.

    New role for brain's support cells in controlling circadian rhythms


    The Medical Research Council (MRC)-funded study published today in the journal Science, found that these star-shaped cells, previously thought of as just supporting neurons in regulating circadian rhythms, can actually lead the tempo of the body's internal clock and have been shown for the first time to be able to control patterns of daily behaviour in mammals.

    The findings of the new study could pave the way for new treatments to be exploited when circadian rhythms are disrupted, which can cause jet lag and sleep disorders, as well as contribute to a range of health conditions, from psychiatric disorders to dementia, diabetes and cancer.

    Circadian rhythms are well known for their role in maintaining human health and although many different types of cells across the body have been found to have their own internal clock, the timing of these clocks is chiefly controlled by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), a small brain region in the hypothalamus which acts as the master clock responsible for regulating daily behaviour.

    This new study, led by the MRC's Laboratory of Molecular Biology (LMB) in Cambridge, used microscopic imaging to observe the detailed internal molecular clock timing of the astrocytes and neurons of the SCN. Surprisingly, this showed that although both types of cell have their own circadian clocks, they are differently regulated and were seen to be active at different times of the day. This delicate interplay was found to be critical in keeping the entire SCN clockwork ticking.

    Following this initial discovery, the scientists found mice genetically altered to silence their internal body clock showed disruption to their SCN function and behaviour but, unexpectedly, found that the restoration of a genetically functional clock in astrocytes alone enabled the mice to regulate their daily activity. This meant that even when astrocytes were the only cell in an animal with a working internal clock, there were still observed patterns of daily behaviour of mice. When the researchers compared this pattern of behaviour to mice whose neuronal clocks were working, they found that the period of regulated activity in the SCN was approximately one hour shorter, which was also reflected by the mouse behaviour, showing that astrocytes were capable of controlling animal behaviour to their own cell-specific tune.

    The study also revealed that glutamate, a neurotransmitter in the brain and central nervous system, acted as the chemical signal used to convey time cues from the working astrocytes of the SCN to their clockless neuronal partners.

    "The discovery that astrocytes can be as effective as neurons in generating and transmitting a circadian timing signal across an animal really surprised us," said Dr Marco Brancaccio, a Dementia Lecturer and UK Dementia Research Institute Fellow at Imperial College London and lead author of the paper, previously at the MRC's LMB when this research was undertaken. "We knew from previous research that these cells played a role in circadian clocks, but we had no idea they could restart the circadian function of neurons. This adds a totally new and unanticipated dimension to the neurobiology of circadian body clocks and suggests some exciting avenues for future research and the potential to develop treatments."

    "This is the first time that it has been demonstrated that astrocytes, cells we'd previously overlooked as mere support cells, can actually control animal behaviour. This is a significant advance in the field of neuroscience," added Dr Michael Hastings, Head of the Neurobiology Division at the MRC's LMB and senior author of the paper.

    Dr Joanna Latimer, Head of Neurosciences and Mental Health at the MRC, said: "In recent years it has become increasingly clear that disruption of the body's internal clock through shift-work, dementia and other neurological diseases can have a dangerous impact on our health and well-being. This research is an important step towards a better understanding of how the brain controls these circadian rhythms at a molecular and cellular level, an essential advance if we are to manage the impact of these conditions more effectively."

    High intake of dietary fiber and whole grains associated with reduced risk of non-communicable diseases

    The results suggest a 15-30% decrease in all-cause and cardiovascular related mortality when comparing people who eat the highest amount of fibre to those who eat the least. Eating fibre-rich foods also reduced incidence of coronary heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and colorectal cancer by 16-24%. Per 1,000 participants, the impact translates into 13 fewer deaths and six fewer cases of coronary heart disease.

    In addition, a meta-analysis of clinical trials suggested that increasing fibre intakes was associated with lower bodyweight and cholesterol, compared with lower intakes.

    The study was commissioned by the World Health Organization to inform the development of new recommendations for optimal daily fibre intake and to determine which types of carbohydrate provide the best protection against non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and weight gain.

    Most people worldwide consume less than 20 g of dietary fibre per day. In 2015, the UK Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition recommended an increase in dietary fibre intake to 30 g per day, but only 9% of UK adults manage to reach this target. In the US, fibre intake among adults averages 15 g a day. Rich sources of dietary fibre include whole grains, pulses, vegetables and fruit.

    "Previous reviews and meta-analyses have usually examined a single indicator of carbohydrate quality and a limited number of diseases so it has not been possible to establish which foods to recommend for protecting against a range of conditions," says corresponding author Professor Jim Mann, the University of Otago, New Zealand.

    "Our findings provide convincing evidence for nutrition guidelines to focus on increasing dietary fibre and on replacing refined grains with whole grains. This reduces incidence risk and mortality from a broad range of important diseases."

    The researchers included 185 observational studies containing data that relate to 135 million person years and 58 clinical trials involving 4,635 adult participants. They focused on premature deaths from and incidence of coronary heart disease, cardiovascular disease and stroke, as well as incidence of type 2 diabetes, colorectal cancer and cancers associated with obesity: breast, endometrial, esophageal and prostate cancer. The authors only included studies with healthy participants, so the findings cannot be applied to people with existing chronic diseases.

    For every 8g increase of dietary fibre eaten per day, total deaths and incidence of coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes and colorectal cancer decreased by 5-27%. Protection against stroke, and breast cancer also increased. Consuming 25g to 29g each day was adequate but the data suggest that higher intakes of dietary fibre could provide even greater protection.

    For every 15g increase of whole grains eaten per day, total deaths and incidence of coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes and colorectal cancer decreased by 2-19%. Higher intakes of whole grains were associated with a 13-33% reduction in NCD risk -- translating into 26 fewer deaths per 1,000 people from all-cause mortality and seven fewer cases of coronary heart disease per 1,000 people. The meta-analysis of clinical trials involving whole grains showed a reduction in bodyweight. Whole grains are high in dietary fibre, which could explain their beneficial effects.

    The study also found that diets with a low glycaemic index and low glycaemic load provided limited support for protection against type 2 diabetes and stroke only. Foods with a low glycaemic index or low glycaemic load may also contain added sugars, saturated fats, and sodium. This may account for the links to health being less clear.

    "The health benefits of fibre are supported by over 100 years of research into its chemistry, physical properties, physiology and effects on metabolism. Fibre-rich whole foods that require chewing and retain much of their structure in the gut increase satiety and help weight control and can favourably influence lipid and glucose levels. The breakdown of fibre in the large bowel by the resident bacteria has additional wide-ranging effects including protection from colorectal cancer." says Professor Jim Mann.

    While their study did not show any risks associated with dietary fibre, the authors note that high intakes might have ill-effects for people with low iron or mineral levels, for whom high levels of whole grains can further reduce iron levels. They also note that the study mainly relates to naturally-occurring fibre rich foods rather than synthetic and extracted fibre, such as powders, that can be added to foods.

    Commenting on the implications and limitations of the study, Professor Gary Frost, Imperial College London, UK, says, "[The authors] report findings from both prospective cohort studies and randomised controlled trials in tandem. This method enables us to understand how altering the quality of carbohydrate intake in randomised controlled trials affects non-communicable disease risk factors and how these changes in diet quality align with disease incidence in prospective cohort studies. This alignment is seen beautifully for dietary fibre intake, in which observational studies reveal a reduction in all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, which is associated with a reduction in bodyweight, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and systolic blood pressure reported in randomised controlled trials... There are some important considerations that arise from this Article. First, total carbohydrate intake was not considered in the systematic review and meta-analysis... Second, although the absence of association between glycaemic index and load with non-communicable disease and risk factors is consistent with another recent systematic review, caution is needed when interpreting these data, as the number of studies is small and findings are heterogeneous. Third, the absence of quantifiable and objective biomarkers for assessing carbohydrate intake means dietary research relies on self-reported intake, which is prone to error and misreporting. Improving the accuracy of dietary assessment is a priority area for nutrition research. The analyses presented by Reynolds and colleagues provides compelling evidence that dietary fibre and whole grain are major determinants of numerous health outcomes and should form part of public health policy."

    świetny art:

    Mitochondria - Why They're Important and What They Need to Function

    http://www.peirsoncenter.com/article...P5fHcSQ3AVABkQ
    correlation doesn't imply causation

  4. #589
    Teraz nie mogę znaleźć tej firmy od kołder. Chodziło o to, że była ciężka a nie była jakoś niesamowicie gruba czy puchowa.
    Coś w tym możę być, na przykład ja nie zasnę bez przykrycia choćby nie wiem co

  5. #590
    Sztywny Pal Azji
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    Cytat Zamieszczone przez htw Zobacz posta
    Próbowałem spać w zimnych warunkach - nie polecam. Delikatny chłodek jest imho optymalny.
    E tam idzie się przyzwyczaić, jakiś czas spałem w 4-7 stopniach, ciężkie dwie pierwsze nocki, a potem z górki.

  6. #591
    A morsujecie może? Ja w tym roku się przełamałem i trzeba przyznać, że rewelacja. Zimne prysznice to nie to samo

  7. #592
    Cytat Zamieszczone przez semozo Zobacz posta
    A morsujecie może? Ja w tym roku się przełamałem i trzeba przyznać, że rewelacja. Zimne prysznice to nie to samo
    Długo się przełamywales? Ja drugą zimę próbuje i tylko do kostek wszedłem. Od razu palce u stóp i rąk mnie bolą. Sąsiad w beczce na tarasie morsuje

  8. #593
    Tylko powiedz w jakim celu? Jakbyś był stworzony do pływania między górami lodowymi to byś się tłustą foką urodził, nie człowiekiem.

  9. #594
    Cytat Zamieszczone przez fazzeerr Zobacz posta
    Tylko powiedz w jakim celu? Jakbyś był stworzony do pływania między górami lodowymi to byś się tłustą foką urodził, nie człowiekiem.
    Zeby nie chorowac podobno ? kto nie morsuje to mowi ze pozniej zdrowszy jest , nie choruje itd

  10. #595
    Sztywny Pal Azji Awatar Krasina
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    kto zainteresowany tematem polecam też poczytać o Wim Hoff metod

  11. #596
    Cytat Zamieszczone przez trytytex Zobacz posta
    Długo się przełamywales? Ja drugą zimę próbuje i tylko do kostek wszedłem. Od razu palce u stóp i rąk mnie bolą. Sąsiad w beczce na tarasie morsuje
    Z tym przełamywaniem się to tak ze dwa lata, ale to raczej z braku chęci ruszenia dupy nad rzekę itp. Teraz jak wlazłem po krótkiej rozgrzewce, to do pasa wrażenie miałem wręcz jakby woda grzała. Powyżej jak krew ucieka do korpusu, robi się boleśniej ale to przyjemne Posiedziałem 3 minuty i tyle, dla mnie bomba. A ból to kwestia psychiki, tylko po wyjściu raczej trzeba szybko się wysuszyć i ubrać, bo z palców ucieka szybko ciepło.


    Cytat Zamieszczone przez fazzeerr Zobacz posta
    Tylko powiedz w jakim celu? Jakbyś był stworzony do pływania między górami lodowymi to byś się tłustą foką urodził, nie człowiekiem.
    No niby tak, ale nikt nie morsuje 2, 5 czy 20 godzin. To tak jak z bańkami stawianymi na plecy, nie ma poparcia w medycynie zachodniej, a jak pogadasz z kilkoma lekarzami z osobna, to wielu przyzna, że to pobudza organizm do samoobrony. Zresztą, człowiek nie został też stworzony do przesiadywania 24h w ogrzewanych pomieszczeniach

    Cytat Zamieszczone przez Krasina Zobacz posta
    kto zainteresowany tematem polecam też poczytać o Wim Hoff metod
    htw, coś tutaj wrzucał nawet.

  12. #597
    Cytat Zamieszczone przez semozo Zobacz posta
    Z tym przełamywaniem się to tak ze dwa lata, ale to raczej z braku chęci ruszenia dupy nad rzekę itp. Teraz jak wlazłem po krótkiej rozgrzewce, to do pasa wrażenie miałem wręcz jakby woda grzała. Powyżej jak krew ucieka do korpusu, robi się boleśniej ale to przyjemne Posiedziałem 3 minuty i tyle, dla mnie bomba. A ból to kwestia psychiki, tylko po wyjściu raczej trzeba szybko się wysuszyć i ubrać, bo z palców ucieka szybko ciepło.



    No niby tak, ale nikt nie morsuje 2, 5 czy 20 godzin. To tak jak z bańkami stawianymi na plecy, nie ma poparcia w medycynie zachodniej, a jak pogadasz z kilkoma lekarzami z osobna, to wielu przyzna, że to pobudza organizm do samoobrony. Zresztą, człowiek nie został też stworzony do przesiadywania 24h w ogrzewanych pomieszczeniach


    htw, coś tutaj wrzucał nawet.
    To może zmień lekarzy na takich co skończyli medycynę, ok?

    Co do ogrzewania, to człowiek utracił w toku ewolucji owłosienie i teraz jesteśmy zależni od zewnętrznego ogrzewania lub odzienia. Więc tak, "człowieki" tak się dobierały w pary, że sukces reprodukcyjny mieli Ci mniej owłosieni i Ci co potrzebują ubrań.

    Alternatywą jest przeniesienie się z powrotem do Afryki, gdzie to nie człowiek musi się dostosowywać do klimatu, bo klimat już nam pasuje.
    Ostatnio edytowane przez fazzeerr ; 14-01-19 o 15:52

  13. #598
    [QUOTE=semozo;814657]Z tym przełamywaniem się to tak ze dwa lata, ale to raczej z braku chęci ruszenia dupy nad rzekę itp. Teraz jak wlazłem po krótkiej rozgrzewce, to do pasa wrażenie miałem wręcz jakby woda grzała. Powyżej jak krew ucieka do korpusu, robi się boleśniej ale to przyjemne Posiedziałem 3 minuty i tyle, dla mnie bomba. A ból to kwestia psychiki, tylko po wyjściu raczej trzeba szybko się wysuszyć i ubrać, bo z palców ucieka szybko ciepło.

    Mrowienia w palach u stóp nie masz?
    Ja jestem zimno lubny i gdyby nie żona to kurtek bym nie nosił ale palce u stóp i rąk to bardzo szybko mi marznął gdy je zamocze

  14. #599
    Tylko chwilowy dyskomfort. Po chwili mija i już nie mam problemu z mrowieniem czy dygotaniem z zimna. To tak samo jak kiedyś pierwszy zimny przysznic powodował hiperwentylację nie do opanowania. Teraz bez efektów specjalnych.

  15. #600
    Sztywny Pal Azji
    Dołączył
    May 2014
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    1 398
    ożywiona dyskusja

    ps. nie będę Wam wchodził miedzy wódkę a przekąskę

    14 STYCZNIA 2019
    When the body's in overdrive, this liver hormone puts the brakes on metabolism


    Researchers at the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute have identified a hormone produced by the liver that tells the body to downshift its metabolism when it's expending a lot of energy.

    The research, scheduled to be published Jan. 14 in Nature Metabolism, reveals a potential target for treating metabolic disorders.
    Our bodies use several systems to maintain precise control of energy homeostasis—balancing the amount of energy we use and the calories we consume. The hormone leptin, for example, signals the brain to suppress appetite and increase burning of calories when energy stores are high.
    "But much less is known about the other side of this equation: energy expenditure," said Jiandie Lin, professor at the LSI and senior study author. "How does the body sense rapid depletion of energy, and how does it tell the brain to adjust the body's metabolism and maintain homeostasis? That's the question we set out to answer."
    By parsing gene expression data in mouse tissues, Lin and his colleagues found a hormone that was elevated when mice were burning a lot of energy, such as when they needed to maintain body temperature in a cold environment. This hormone, tsukushi (or TSK), is excreted primarily by the liver—a central player in nutritional, metabolic and hormonal pathways.
    "We think that TSK is somehow dampening energy expenditure," said Lin, who is also a professor of cell and developmental biology at the U-M Medical School. "When there is a rapid loss of energy, it puts a brake on metabolism. If we remove this brake, our prediction was that the mice would have accelerated burning of calories. And that turned out to be the case."
    When mice temporarily went without food, those lacking TSK lost significantly more weight than normal mice. The mice without TSK also tended to have a higher body temperature than normal mice, indicating that their bodies were burning more energy when the TSK brake was removed.
    The researchers also tested metabolic responses in mice given a high-fat diet. Normal mice approximately doubled in weight; the mice that lacked TSK, however, experienced only about a 30 percent increase in weight and displayed better metabolic parameters than the normal mice.
    "We saw substantial protection against obesity," said Qiuyu Wang, a postdoctoral fellow in Lin's lab and lead author of the study. "And it comes with better glucose levels, reduced lipids, reduced fatty liver—really the whole package is improved."
    The researchers believe the hormone achieves these effects by acting on the nerves that stimulate the activity of so-called brown fat, or thermogenic fat—which creates heat by burning energy. Lin and his colleagues next hope to investigate how TSK sends signals to the nerves to control fat burning and to explore strategies to dial down the TSK brake to treat metabolic disease.
    An accompanying study from the Lin lab, published Dec. 15 in the journal Molecular Metabolism, showed that TSK deficiency also protects mice from diet-induced fatty liver disease. These findings illustrate the multifaceted beneficial effects of blocking TSK in preventing or treating metabolic disease, Lin says.
    More research is needed to determine whether and how this hormone could be used to treat human metabolic disorders. But this latest research opens a potential new strategy for understanding and improving metabolic homeostasis.
    The Nature Metabolism paper is titled "The hepatokine tsukushi gates energy expenditure via brown fat sympathetic innervation."
    dobrze przy tym pamiętać, że wątroba jest głównym miejscem konwersji T4 --> T3.

    Obesity-Induced Cellular Senescence Drives Anxiety and Impairs Neurogenesis



    Cellular senescence entails a stable cell-cycle arrest and a pro-inflammatory secretory phenotype, which contributes to aging and age-related diseases. Obesity is associated with increased senescent cell burden and neuropsychiatric disorders, including anxiety and depression. To investigate the role of senescence in obesity-related neuropsychiatric dysfunction, we used the INK-ATTAC mouse model, from which p16Ink4a-expressing senescent cells can be eliminated, and senolytic drugs dasatinib and quercetin. We found that obesity results in the accumulation of senescent glial cells in proximity to the lateral ventricle, a region in which adult neurogenesis occurs. Furthermore, senescent glial cells exhibit excessive fat deposits, a phenotype we termed “accumulation of lipids in senescence.” Clearing senescent cells from high fat-fed or leptin receptor-deficient obese mice restored neurogenesis and alleviated anxiety-related behavior. Our study provides proof-of-concept evidence that senescent cells are major contributors to obesity-induced anxiety and that senolytics are a potential new therapeutic avenue for treating neuropsychiatric disorders.
    Crosstalk between metabolism and circadian clocks.

    Humans, like all mammals, partition their daily behaviour into activity (wakefulness) and rest (sleep) phases that differ largely in their metabolic requirements. The circadian clock evolved as an autonomous timekeeping system that aligns behavioural patterns with the solar day and supports the body functions by anticipating and coordinating the required metabolic programmes. The key component of this synchronization is a master clock in the brain, which responds to light-darkness cues from the environment. However, to achieve circadian control of the entire organism, each cell of the body is equipped with its own circadian oscillator that is controlled by the master clock and confers rhythmicity to individual cells and organs through the control of rate-limiting steps of metabolic programmes. Importantly, metabolic regulation is not a mere output function of the circadian system, but nutrient, energy and redox levels signal back to cellular clocks in order to reinforce circadian rhythmicity and to adapt physiology to temporal tissue-specific needs. Thus, multiple systemic and molecular mechanisms exist that connect the circadian clock with metabolism at all levels, from cellular organelles to the whole organism, and deregulation of this circadian-metabolic crosstalk can lead to various pathologies.
    Why we should be watching the sun, not the clock
    https://www.theguardian.com/news/201...ht-saving-time

    Effectiveness of grounded sleeping on recovery after intensive eccentric muscle loading
    Purpose: We set out to investigate the effectiveness of grounded sleeping on the time course of recovery with respect to muscle soreness and athletic performance after intensive eccentric muscle loading. Methods: Twenty-two healthy participants were recruited for this study and randomly assigned to an experimental group (GRD, grounded sleeping, n = 12) or control group (UGD, sham-grounded sleeping, n = 10) to evaluate the effects of 10 days recovery with GRD vs. UGD following a single intensive downhill treadmill intervention in a triple-blinded (participant, tester and data analyst) manner. To operationalize recovery a test battery was performed at baseline and on days 1, 2, 3, 5, 7 and 10 post-intervention: 1) perception of muscle soreness (VAS), 2) creatine kinase blood levels (CK), 3) maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) for both legs, 4) counter movement jump (CMJ) and drop jump (DJ) performance. Furthermore, in four participants blood was sampled for detailed analysis of complete blood counts and serum-derived inflammation markers. Results: The downhill treadmill running intervention led to distinct changes in all measured parameters related to fatigue. These changes were detectable already 5-min post intervention and were not fully recovered 10 days post intervention. GRD led to less pronounced decrease in performance (CMJ, MVIC) and less increase with respect to CK compared with UGD (all P<0.05). Detailed blood samples demonstrated that grounded sleeping modulates the recovery process by a) keeping a constant hemoconcentration, as represented by the number of erythrocytes, and the hemoglobin/hematocrit values; and b) by the reduction of muscle damage-associated inflammation markers such as, IP-10, MIP-1α and sP-Selectin. Conclusion: The downhill running protocol is a feasible methodology to produce long term muscle soreness and muscular fatigue. GRD was shown to result in faster recovery and/or less pronounced markers of muscle damage and inflammation. GRD might be seen as a simple methodology to enhance acute and long-term recovery after intensive eccentric exercises.
    The world's insomniacs revealed: Interactive tool maps the countries that have trouble sleeping



    The map is based on the number of people tweeting about struggling to sleep around the world
    Users can zoom in on their specific area, or view a map showing a wider range
    The US has the most people tweeting about insomnia, followed by Brazil, Argentina and the UK
    The map also has a function that helps visitors to time their breathing to enable them to relax and drift off
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencet...ampaign=buffer


    spierdolenie poziom expert:



    1 sty 2019
    [YT] [/YT]

    w dużym uproszczeniu - nadmiar protonów to stan zapalny, ten nadmiar można szybko rozsprzęglać wbudowanym mechanizmem chodzi oczywiście o UPC1. Protony wychodzą w postaci ciepła i to by było na tyle oczywiście parę gratisów zostaje ale to baza do zrozumienia, obrazków które to tłumaczą jest w chuj w tym temacie.
    Ostatnio edytowane przez htw ; 14-01-19 o 21:22
    correlation doesn't imply causation

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